Australia’s English Problem: a new report on AMEP

James Button has written a new narrative, a proposal to renew the Adult Migrant English Program (AMEP), for the Scanlon Institute [disclosure: I am affiliated with the Scanlon Institute’s Research Committee].

Titled “Australia’s English Problem: How to renew our once celebrated Adult Migrant English Program“, the report details the deterioration of the AMEP over time and the consequences this has for new migrants today. Recently the number of participants has dropped and teachers are leaving without being replaced, however Button rightly notes the demise began decades ago.

Many migrants in the program are unable to attain the recommended baseline of English proficiency in the number of hours allowed. In addition, inflexible service delivery means the twin pillars of migrant settlement – language and employment – are too often in direct tension with each other at the very time when migrants need the most support to begin their lives in Australia.

Below are the key messages and a set of recommendations from the report.

Key messages

  • English language learning is central to Australian nation building, and should be central to immigration and settlement policy.
  • The Australian Government has a long and proud record of helping migrants to learn English. That record is threatened today.
  • The groups most at risk of not speaking English well are sections of the Chinese community, refugees, and some women.
  • Five large-scale shifts in the economy, the source countries of Australia’s migrants, diaspora communities, and the practice and philosophy of government have created significant difficulties for the 71-year old AMEP program.
  • The program, which has been a world leader in language learning, suffers from a lack of clarity in balancing its settlement and employment objectives.

Considerations for how to improve the AMEP

  • Extend the time in which migrants can enrol in and complete the AMEP, while
    continuing to encourage migrants to start the program as soon as possible after arrival.
  • Uncap the AMEP Extend sub-program, so that all students can study at least 1000 hours.
  • Maintain and extend the AMEP sub-program, the Settlement Language Pathways into Education and Training (SLPET).
  • Restore government funding for independent research on the AMEP.
  • Promote a diversity of ways to deliver the AMEP, notably in online and distance learning.
  • Restate the settlement focus of the AMEP as part of developing more sophisticated and realistic outcome measures for the program.
  • Incorporate English language learning into more personalised approaches to settlement services.

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